Thursday, June 28, 2012

Egyptian Catholics adopt wait and see policy with Mohammed Morsi

The election of the Muslim Brotherhood's Mohammed Morsi to President, makes Christians "insecure".

Beyond the "beautiful words," Christians want to "see the facts", says Fr. Greiche Rafiq, spokesman for the Catholic Church in Egypt, speaking to AsiaNews.

"The Muslim Brotherhood - said Fr. Greiche - have a poor track record in the history of their relations with Christians. They have always been supporters of a policy that wants to implement Sharia law and Islamization of Egyptian society in dress, in the workplace and traditions of everyday life. " For this, he adds, Christians are "insecure" and not really sure that this victory should be celebrated.

Yesterday, after the official declaration of his victory, Mohammed Morsi promised that his leadership will also include secular and Christian representatives, and has reassured women about their rights. But Fr. Greiche is sceptical: "From experience, we know what the policy of the Muslim Brotherhood is. Beautiful words are good, but we need facts."

Christian minorities have long been asking for equal rights in building places of worship and freedom of expression, in addition to the elimination of discrimination in the workplace and in society. The Jasmine Revolution, which led to the downfall of Mubarak, had embraced these ideas and promoted common citizenship for Muslims and Christians, with equal rights and duties. 

But the elections were concluded with a stand-off between, the Muslim Brotherhood's Morsi and Ahmed Shafic, candidate of the establishment and the army. Fr. Greiche confirms that there are many young people from the revolution among Morsi's current supporters: "Not wanting the military - he says - they have endorsed Morsi".
 
Mohammed Morsi praised the revolution and martyrs and asked the "great people of Egypt" to "strengthen our national unity."

Fr. Greiche expected that there will be an increasingly close competition between the military - who do not want to lose their power in Egyptian society - and the Muslim Brotherhood, whom the establishment fought against for years.

"There are already signs of an impasse - he says. By the beginning of his term, July 1 Morsi should swear before the Constitutional Court, which currently consists of the Military Council. Instead Morsi want to vote before parliament, which was dissolved over a week ago, eliminating the Islamists victory. The future of society and the economy is likely to be blocked by this standoff between these two great powers. "

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